new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale
new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale__left
new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale__right

May contain writing, notes, highlighting, bends or folds. Text is readable. Pages and cover mostly intact. May show normal wear and tear. Item may be missing CD. Ships directly from Amazon.
See more
Sold by ZBK Books and fulfilled by Amazon.
[{"displayPrice":"$11.99","priceAmount":11.99,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"11","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"99","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"xebk5I0bpqq8ry%2B4Yj%2F%2BsCUOjbe8R%2BgWiuefDwPnmIWjzHfuEF1XFfH1SwUmrHv3CelVmfrnmCkREVS6QsmDqelbHk4GESf6A6sOd4wmnmWdG28MTeelH64UrMzQQJ19W5y5drvTb3M%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"NEW"},{"displayPrice":"$7.98","priceAmount":7.98,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"7","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"98","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"7ZwNnhmtAzTI5fRh6jfax8L2%2BRLTJ%2BEjC9KW%2FngVfJ0%2BgoFCOnEwj3K3zMNeHUToIQyuPcTF9vGE9bKdyHs1ruaWCw19kQfI%2B6mrMFl18g0QKJte%2Bm%2FlQ6kKeVXSihyKx37ll%2F2Pybm%2BDTG1C9qZVqmaCd2MLOp2n10XSL8BsPm533S8%2BpAlw%2FnJpbIVEHDa","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"USED"}]
$$11.99 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$11.99
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
ADD TO LIST
Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
SELL ON AMAZON
Share this product with friends
Text Message
WhatsApp
Copy
press and hold to copy
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Join or create book clubs
Choose books together
Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. Explore Amazon Book Clubs
Inspire a love of reading with Amazon Book Box for Kids
Discover delightful children''s books with Amazon Book Box, a subscription that delivers new books every 1, 2, or 3 months — new Amazon Book Box Prime customers receive 15% off your first box. Learn more.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Frequently bought together

+
+
Choose items to buy together.
Buy all three: $33.58
$11.99
$10.23
$11.36
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Book details

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Description

Product Description

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE • Set in the near-future, Into the Forest is a powerfully imagined novel that focuses on the relationship between two teenage sisters living alone in their Northern California forest home.

Over 30 miles from the nearest town, and several miles away from their nearest neighbor, Nell and Eva struggle to survive as society begins to decay and collapse around them. No single event precedes society''s fall. There is talk of a war overseas and upheaval in Congress, but it still comes as a shock when the electricity runs out and gas is nowhere to be found. The sisters consume the resources left in the house, waiting for the power to return. Their arrival into adulthood, however, forces them to reexamine their place in the world and their relationship to the land and each other.

Reminiscent of Margaret Atwood''s A Handmaid''s Tale, Into the Forest is a mesmerizing and thought-provoking novel of hope and despair set in a frighteningly plausible near-future America.

Praise for Into the Forest

“[A] beautifully written and often profoundly moving novel.” San Francisco Chronicle

“A work of extraordinary power, insight and lyricism,  Into the Forest is both an urgent warning and a passionate celebration of life and love.” —Riane Eisler, author of The Chalice and the Blade

“From the first page, the sense of crisis and the lucid, honest voice of the . . . narrator pull the reader in. . . . A truly admirable addition to a genre defined by the very high standards of George Orwell''s  1984.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Beautifully written.” Kirkus Reviews

“This beautifully written story captures the essential nature of the sister bond: the fierce struggle to be true to one’s own self, only to learn that true strength comes from what they are able to share together.” —Carol Saline, co-author of Sisters

“Jean Hegland’s sense of character is firm, warm, and wise. . . . [A] fine first novel.” —John Keeble, author of Yellowfish

Review

“[A] beautifully written and often profoundly moving novel.” San Francisco Chronicle

“A work of extraordinary power, insight and lyricism, Into the Forest is both an urgent warning and a passionate celebration of life and love.” —Riane Eisler, author of The Chalice and the Blade

“From the first page, the sense of crisis and the lucid, honest voice of the . . . narrator pull the reader in. . . . A truly admirable addition to a genre defined by the very high standards of George Orwell''s 1984.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Beautifully written.” Kirkus Reviews

“This beautifully written story captures the essential nature of the sister bond: the fierce struggle to be true to one’s own self, only to learn that true strength comes from what they are able to share together.” —Carol Saline, co-author of Sisters

“Jean Hegland’s sense of character is firm, warm, and wise. . . . [A] fine first novel.” —John Keeble, author of Yellowfish

From the Publisher

Praise for Jean Hegland''s Into the Forest

"[A] beautifully written and often profoundly moving novel."
--San Francisco Chronicle

"A work of extraordinary power, insight and lyricism, Into the Forest is both an urgent warning and a passionate celebration of life and love."
--Riane Eisler, author of The Chalice and the Blade

*"From the first page, the sense of crisis and the lucid, honest voice of the...narrator pull the reader in....A truly admirable addition to a genre defined by the very high standards of George Orwell''s 1984."
--Publishers Weekly,starred review

"Beautifully written."
--Kirkus Reviews

"This beautifully written story captures the essential nature of the sister bond: the fierce struggle to be true to one''s own self, only to learn that true strength comes from what they are able to share together."
--Carol Saline, co-author of Sisters

"Jean Hegland''s sense of character is firm, warm, and wise....[A] fine first novel."
--John Keeble, author of Yellowfish

From the Inside Flap

Set in the near-future, Into the Forest is a powerfully imagined novel that focuses on the relationship between two teenage sisters living alone in their Northern California forest home.

Over 30 miles from the nearest town, and several miles away from their nearest neighbor, Nell and Eva struggle to survive as society begins to decay and collapse around them. No single event precedes society''s fall. There is talk of a war overseas and upheaval in Congress, but it still comes as a shock when the electricity runs out and gas is nowhere to be found. The sisters consume the resources left in the house, waiting for the power to return. Their arrival into adulthood, however, forces them to reexamine their place in the world and their relationship to the land and each other.

Reminiscent of Margaret Atwood''s A Handmaid''s Tale, Into the Forest is a mesmerizing and thought-provoking novel of hope and despair set in a frighteningly plausible near-future America.

From the Back Cover

Set in the near-future, "Into the Forest is a powerfully imagined novel that focuses on the relationship between two teenage sisters living alone in their Northern California forest home.
Over 30 miles from the nearest town, and several miles away from their nearest neighbor, Nell and Eva struggle to survive as society begins to decay and collapse around them. No single event precedes society''s fall. There is talk of a war overseas and upheaval in Congress, but it still comes as a shock when the electricity runs out and gas is nowhere to be found. The sisters consume the resources left in the house, waiting for the power to return. Their arrival into adulthood, however, forces them to reexamine their place in the world and their relationship to the land and each other.
Reminiscent of Margaret Atwood''s "A Handmaid''s Tale, Into the Forest is a mesmerizing and thought-provoking novel of hope and despair set in a frighteningly plausible near-future America.

About the Author

Jean Hegland is the author of The Life Within: Celebration of a Pregnancy.  She lives with her husband and three children in northern California on fifty-five acres of second-growth forest.  She is at work on her next novel, which explores the issues of motherhood.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

It''s strange, writing these first words, like leaning down into the musty stillness of a well and seeing my face peer up from the water--so small and from such an unfamiliar angle I''m startled to realize the reflection is my own.  After all this time a pen feels stiff and awkward in my hand.  And I have to admit that this notebook, with its wilderness of blank pages, seems almost more threat than gift--for what can I write here that it will not hurt to remember?

You could write about now, Eva said, about this time. This morning I was so certain I would use this notebook for studying that I had to work to keep from scoffing at her suggestion.  But now I see she may be right.  Every subject I think of--from economics to meteorology, from anatomy to geography to history--seems to circle around on itself, to lead me unavoidably back to now, to here, today.

Today is Christmas Day.  I can''t avoid that.  We''ve crossed the days off the calendar much too conscientiously to be wrong about the date, however much we might wish we were.  Today is Christmas Day, and Christmas Day is one more day to live through, one more day to be endured so that someday soon this time will be behind us.

By next Christmas this will all be over, and my sister and I will have regained the lives we are meant to live.  The electricity will be back, the phones will work.  Planes will fly above our clearing once again.  In town there will be food in the stores and gas at the service stations.  Long before next Christmas we will have indulged in everything we now lack and crave--soap and shampoo, toilet paper and milk, fresh fruit and meat.  My computer will be running, Eva''s CD player will be working.  We''ll be listening to the radio, reading the newspaper, using the Internet.  Banks and schools and libraries will have reopened, and Eva and I will have left this house where we now live like shipwrecked orphans.  She will be dancing with the corps of the San Francisco Ballet, I''ll have finished my first semester at Harvard, and this wet, dark day the calendar has insisted we call Christmas will be long, long over.

"Merry semi-pagan, slightly literary, and very commercial Christmas," our father would always announce on Christmas morning, when, long before the midwinter dawn, Eva and I would team up in the hall outside our parents'' bedroom.  Jittery with excitement, we would plead with them to get up, to come downstairs, to hurry, while they yawned, insisted on donning bathrobes, on washing their faces and brushing their teeth, even--if our father was being particularly infuriating--on making coffee.

After the clutter and laughter of present-opening came the midday dinner we used to take for granted, phone calls from distant relatives, Handel''s Messiah issuing triumphantly from the CD player.  At some point during the afternoon the four of us would take a walk down the dirt road that ends at our clearing.  The brisk air and green forest would clear our senses and our palates, and by the time we reached the bridge and were ready to turn back, our father would have inevitably announced, "This is the real Christmas present, by god--peace and quiet and clean air.  No neighbors for four miles, and no town for thirty-two.  Thank Buddha, Shiva, Jehovah, and the California Department of Forestry we live at the end of the road!"

Later, after night had fallen and the house was dark except for the glow of bulbs on the Christmas tree, Mother would light the candles of the nativity carousel, and we would spend a quiet moment standing together before it, watching the shepherds, wise men, and angels circle around the little holy family.

"Yep," our father would say, before we all wandered off to nibble at the turkey carcass and cut slivers off the cold plum pudding, "that''s the story.  Could be better, could be worse.  But at least there''s a baby at the center of it."

This Christmas there''s none of that.

There are no strings of lights, no Christmas cards.  There are no piles of presents, no long-distance phone calls from great-aunts and second cousins, no Christmas carols. There is no turkey, no plum pudding, no stroll to the bridge with our parents, no Messiah. This year Christmas is nothing but another white square on a calendar that is almost out of dates, an extra cup of tea, a few moments of candlelight, and, for each of us, a single gift.

Why do we bother?

Three years ago--when I was fourteen and Eva fifteen--I asked that same question one rainy night a week before Christmas.  Father was grumbling over the number of cards he still had to write, and Mother was hidden in her workroom with her growling sewing machine, emerging periodically to take another batch of cookies from the oven and prod me into washing the mixing bowls.

"Nell, I need those dishes done so I can start the pudding before I go to bed," she said as she closed the oven door on the final sheet of cookies.

"Okay," I muttered, turning the next page of the book in which I was immersed.

"Tonight, Nell," she said.

"Why are we doing this?" I demanded, looking up from my book in irritation.

"Because they''re dirty," she answered, pausing to hand me a warm gingersnap before she swept back to the mysteries of her sewing.

"Not the dishes," I grumbled.

"Then what, Pumpkin?" asked my father as he licked an  envelope and emphatically crossed another name off his list.

"Christmas.  All this mess and fuss and we aren''t even really Christians."

"Goddamn right we aren''t," said our father, laying down his pen, bounding up from the table by the front window, already warming to the energy of his own talk.

"We''re not Christians, we''re capitalists," he said. "Everybody in this whangdanged country is a capitalist, whether he likes it or not.  Everyone in this country is one of the world''s most voracious consumers, using resources at a rate twenty times greater than that of anyone else on this poor earth.  And Christmas is our golden opportunity to pick up the pace."

When he saw I was turning back to my book, he added, "Why are we doing Christmas?  Beats me.  Tell you what--let''s quit.  Throw in the towel.  I''ll drive into town tomorrow and return the gifts. We''ll give the cookies to the chickens and write all our friends and relations and explain we''ve given up Christmas for Lent.  It''s a shame to waste my vacation, though," he continued in mock sadness.

"I know." He snapped his fingers and ducked as though an idea had just struck him on the back of the head.  "We''ll replace the beams under the utility room.  Forget those dishes, Nell, and find me the jack."

I glared at him, hating him for half a second for the effortless way he deflected my barbs and bad temper.  I huffed into the kitchen, grabbed a handful of cookies, and wandered upstairs to hide in my bedroom with my book.

Later I could hear him in the kitchen, washing the dishes I had ignored and singing at the top of his voice,

"We three kings of oil and tar,
tried to smoke a rubber cigar.
It was loaded, and it exploded,
higher than yonder star."


The next year even I wouldn''t have dared to question Christmas. Mother was sick, and we all clung to everything that was bright and sweet and warm, as though we thought if we ignored the shadows, they would vanish into the brilliance of hope.  But the following spring the cancer took her anyway, and last Christmas my sister and I did our best to bake and wrap and sing in a frantic effort to convince our father--and ourselves--that we could be happy without her.

I thought we were miserable last Christmas.  I thought we were miserable because our mother was dead and our father had grown distant and silent.  But there were lights on the tree and a turkey in the oven.  Eva was Clara in the Redwood Ballet''s performance of The Nutcracker, and I had just received the results of my Scholastic Aptitude Tests, which were good enough--if I did okay on the College Board Achievement Tests--to justify the letter I was composing to the Harvard Admissions Committee.

But this year all that is either gone or in abeyance.  This year Eva and I celebrate only because it''s less painful to admit that today is Christmas than to pretend it isn''t.

It''s hard to come up with a present for someone when there is no store in which to buy it, when there is little privacy in which to make it, when everything you own, every bean and grain of rice, each spoon and pen and paper clip, is also owned by the person to whom you want to give a gift.

I gave Eva a pair of her own toe shoes.  Two weeks ago I snuck the least battered pair from the closet in her studio and renovated them as best I could, working on them in secret while she was practicing.  With the last drops of our mother''s spot remover, I cleaned the tattered satin.  I restitched the leather soles with monofilament from our father''s tackle box.  I soaked the mashed toe boxes in a mixture of water and wood glue, did my best to reshape them, hid them behind the stove to dry, and then soaked and shaped and dried them again and again.  Finally I darned the worn satin at the tips of the toes so that she could get a few more hours of use from them by first dancing on the web of stitches I had sewn.

She gasped when she opened the box and saw them.

"I don''t know if they''re any good," I said.  "They''re probably way too soft.  I had no idea what I was doing."

But while I was still protesting, she flung her arms around me. We clung together for a long second and then we both leapt back. These days our bodies carry our sorrows as though they were bowls brimming with water.  We must always be careful; the slightest jolt or unexpected shift and the water will spill and spill and spill.

Eva''s gift to me was this notebook.

"It''s not a computer," she said, as I lifted it from its wrinkled wrapping paper, recycled from some birthday long ago and not yet sacrificed as fire-starter.  "But it''s all blank, every page."

"Blank paper!" I marveled.  "Where on earth did you get it?"

"I found it behind my dresser.  It must have fallen back there years ago.  I thought you could use it to write about this time.  For our grandchildren or something."

Right now, grandchildren seem less likely than aliens from Mars, and when  I first lifted the stained cardboard cover and flipped through these pages,  slightly musty, and blank except for their scaffolding of lines, I have to admit  I was thinking more about studying for the Achievement Tests than about  chronicling this time.  And yet it feels good to write.  I miss the quick click  of my computer keys and the glow of the screen, but tonight this pen feels like  Plaza wine in my hand, and already the lines that lead these words down the  page seem more like the warp of our mother''s loom and less like the bars I had  first imagined them to be.  Already I see how much there is to say.



  

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
UP NEXT
CANCEL
00:00
-00:00
Shop
Text Message
Email
Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Share
More videos
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
540 global ratings

Reviews with videos

Top reviews from the United States

pml
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Silly
Reviewed in the United States on August 1, 2016
This book reads like a young adult novel, maybe it is but I didn''t notice it advertised as such. It''s not for the sophisticated reader. The characters don''t talk to each other, it''s mostly description of the two sister''s boring lives in their house in the woods, alone,... See more
This book reads like a young adult novel, maybe it is but I didn''t notice it advertised as such. It''s not for the sophisticated reader. The characters don''t talk to each other, it''s mostly description of the two sister''s boring lives in their house in the woods, alone, because their parents died and the whole world is......what, we don''t really know, it''s never explained other than lots of people died and there is no electricity. The sisters spend lots of time doing impractical things like practicing ballet and studying to go to Harvard. I kid you not. Don''t waste your time with this one.
42 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kristen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dystopian Little House on the Prairie
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2017
I did not expect to, but I absolutely loved this book. Generally, I don''t love stories that delve deep into family dynamics, because I find it gets dry very quickly. Not so with Into the Forest. Every detail was riveting and beautiful, and the book painted a... See more
I did not expect to, but I absolutely loved this book.

Generally, I don''t love stories that delve deep into family dynamics, because I find it gets dry very quickly. Not so with Into the Forest. Every detail was riveting and beautiful, and the book painted a clear picture of each scene.

It''s sort of a dystopian Little House on the Prairie. I definitely won''t include any spoilers, but it''s about two sisters who live in the forest after some sort of terrible worldwide event. It details their relationship, hardships, ingenuity, passions, inner monologues, grief, and joy. It whisked me away, and I stayed thoroughly grossed throughout the book due to the rich descriptions and character development.

I am part of a book chain, and although I was initially going to send a different book to the group, once I finished Into the Forest, I knew I had to send it instead because it appeals to so many genres, interests, and experiences.
18 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
davey daverino
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nice character evolution, and a believable story.
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2016
I very much enjoyed this book. The story''s evolution of Nell and Eva from somewhat spoiled girls --but very much loved by their parents-- into two wise women is very enjoyable. The book is more diary than story, and if you''re looking for a book concerning Mad Max type... See more
I very much enjoyed this book. The story''s evolution of Nell and Eva from somewhat spoiled girls --but very much loved by their parents-- into two wise women is very enjoyable. The book is more diary than story, and if you''re looking for a book concerning Mad Max type apocalyptic action, this is definitely not that kind of book. It''s more in the vein of Cormac McCarthy''s ''The Road'', but not nearly as bleak, and the setting is generally at or near the protagonist''s home in the woods. If the s*** hits the fan, the environment that the girls live in is much more realistic in that regard. I would posit that the author really did her homework about what it would take for the girls to live through such a situation. While reflecting upon the story after I finishing the book I came to the conclusion that it would make for a great movie. I also hope that Hegland writes a followup of the story. I''m really curious as to what happens to Nell and Eva as they grow older.
19 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Judy M. Baker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Into the Forest is a Goodread
Reviewed in the United States on July 5, 2016
Set in an isolated part of Northern California''s redwood forest, Jean Hegland''s novel unwinds as the world as we know it falls into entropy. The horrific challenges these people endured and how they were tempered by the fire of... See more
Set in an isolated part of Northern California''s redwood forest, Jean Hegland''s novel unwinds as the world as we know it falls into entropy. The horrific challenges these people endured and how they were tempered by the fire of their circumstances moved me and kept me turning each page with eagerness.

Jean Hegland paints a dystopian landscape that is painfully close to reality. She creates a strong foundation and builds out the rooms of this story, brick by brick. Her use of language is reminiscent of Barbara Kingsolver''s, yet distinctly her own creation.

Relationships are tested, twisted and nearly broken apart, only to heal and become stronger. At its core, it is a story about the love the grows out of the hearts and minds of one family, embodied most clearly in the relationship between the two sisters, Nell, and Eva. They live with their father and free-spirited mother on an isolated farm in a fictionalized location the redwoods of Northern California.

I reveled in the details and patience with which she painted this world. A strong connection to nature permeates the story. The rhythm of her language flows like a strong clear stream. She deftly amplifies the emotional landscape within Nell and Eva contrasting it with their external reality, seasonal transformations that offered bounty and danger in equal measure.

These are unique, smart, quirky people. Each has gifts and blind spots. Through it all, they are enmeshed with each other like the roots of the forest trees and plants that surround them.

It is a coming of age tale of survival. The principal characters are far from perfect. They stumble as they learn how to exist in a world where nothing comes easily except for being true to their innermost selves.

I ached with pain as I read each new struggle. I laughed and wept as the two typical teenage girls discover boys and who they are meant to be. Their lives are turned inside out and yet they find a way to do more than simply exist. These girls are resourceful at times, frightened, and always real.

I could imagine myself in their world where technology and civilization as we know it disintegrates.

It is a well-told tale and left me wanting more.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jasmine Acosta
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just odd....
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2016
I looked forward to reading this book- I was homeschooled and lived in the NW for a time. I was impatient and decided to get it on Kindle instead of ordering the hard copy. Thank God! This one is getting returned. I won''t be rereading. LIKE other readers here, I... See more
I looked forward to reading this book- I was homeschooled and lived in the NW for a time. I was impatient and decided to get it on Kindle instead of ordering the hard copy. Thank God! This one is getting returned. I won''t be rereading.

LIKE other readers here, I was shocked by the lesbian sex scene b/t the sisters. What the heck?!?! It does.not fit at all.Honestly, the story does seem like it has a different author after Nell returns after deciding not to leave with Eli. It is possible that one or both girls would face a rape scenario. However, given the background of the two girls, an attempted abortion seems more likely than Eva''s resulting Earth Mother routine.

Very disappointed. The author shifts from telling a story (although very slowly) to pushing a very strange alternative lifestyle scenario. In the end, (spoiler alert), we are left with 2 sisters in an incestuous, lesbian relationship raising the child of the elder sister''s rapist. They then burn up all their supplies in a world where people are starving and head into the forest with nothing- presumably to live a neo-Native American lifestyle. Pointless, weird, and illogical.
28 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Precise DisarrayTop Contributor: Pets
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
worth the time, just not a great read
Reviewed in the United States on March 10, 2021
I have a fondness toward dystopian stories even though most have flaws.. Some are over the top male fantasies, and some are so freaking bleak that it makes me wonder why I am drawn to the genre. Some are political and grating. This is mildly realistic in that not everyone... See more
I have a fondness toward dystopian stories even though most have flaws.. Some are over the top male fantasies, and some are so freaking bleak that it makes me wonder why I am drawn to the genre. Some are political and grating. This is mildly realistic in that not everyone will know what to do or how to handle a situation like this. SO I have forgiveness in how clueless these ladies are-- though it would have been nice to see more skill involved. I actually double checked to see if this was a male or female writer. Female..not what I expected. Anyway, I liked most of this story save for a couple of cliched points. One I thought was a tad over the top and unnecessary, and likely improbable. I was shocked that in this sense the movie was better than the book and the movie.

Is it worth the read.. yeh, sure. It isn''t great, but it is solidly in the genre and it does provide another snapshot of what it could look like. It is a quick read, so no worries of it being a waste of time.
Helpful
Report
Spud's PlaceTop Contributor: Pets
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Book I Can''t Forget
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2014
I first read this book when it came out in 1998. I was living in Northern California at the time (Santa Rosa) near the locals of the story. I had spent my youth riding horseback and hiking with my dog in the redwood forests of Santa Cruz County. The forest part of the title... See more
I first read this book when it came out in 1998. I was living in Northern California at the time (Santa Rosa) near the locals of the story. I had spent my youth riding horseback and hiking with my dog in the redwood forests of Santa Cruz County. The forest part of the title appealed to me so I purchased the book and was immediately immersed in a world I both understood and used to fantasize about; what would I do if I had to live on my own in the forest?

This book was my introduction to dystopian literature. The story is excellent as described by many other reviewers here. It is well written, evolves with the young women and the unfolding crisis of a world gone off the grid without explanation; no power, no news, no telephone service or gasoline as gradually local sources of information, law enforcement and supply dry up.

How do two intelligent young women create a strategy for self-protection and survival? These characters are about as real as fiction can make them.

The outcomes of the failure of the rules of civilized community that make us feel secure are realistic and sometimes heartbreaking. But somehow, at the end, you believe these girls, now forced to become women, will find ways, not just to survive, but to thrive and build a future worth living. I had always wished for a sequel because my hopes for them were so high.

If you are new to dystopian literature, start with this novel. It is not overwritten, overwrought with emotion or filled with silly suppositions. The writer has made "practical necessity" a thrilling and maturing adventure that will stick with you emotionally and intellectually for years to come.

I have just purchased my second copy of this book. I passed on my first copy to friends before leaving California. Now I want a copy to keep.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Celine Derudder
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mesmerising and truly original - love it or hate it !
Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2021
Sometimes it seems that all books resemble one another and blur together except for a few that stand out and stay with you. Into the forest is one of those books. It’s a survival and coming of age novel like no other. I think readers will either love it or hate it. I loved... See more
Sometimes it seems that all books resemble one another and blur together except for a few that stand out and stay with you. Into the forest is one of those books. It’s a survival and coming of age novel like no other. I think readers will either love it or hate it. I loved the “dear diary” approach playing with the timeline; the fact that the sisters didn’t get along all the time, that events appeared both unpredictable and inevitable (like a good tragedy does) I also liked that they didn’t have survival skills to start with despite having lived next to the forest all their lives (something that feels “too easy” in many novels with a survival element). I also enjoyed the very light touch of magical realism. The end is magnificent and crazy but logical.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Ann Fairweather
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The best of dystopian!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 25, 2020
This is an incredibly beautiful book. The perfect story really. Not in a very long time did I enjoy reading a novel so much. It probably was written for me! It might not be very thick but it feels like it covers eons. At first we have a regular family, father mother and two...See more
This is an incredibly beautiful book. The perfect story really. Not in a very long time did I enjoy reading a novel so much. It probably was written for me! It might not be very thick but it feels like it covers eons. At first we have a regular family, father mother and two sisters, living in a house in the woods some 30 miles from the nearest town. Everything is then happy and perfect. But later the mother, an ex-ballerina, dies of cancer. With a heavy heart, the reduced family carries on at best. Eva wants to be a ballerina too and talented, she trains to join the San Francisco ballet. Nell is more academic and prepares her exams for Harvard. Then disaster strucks. We never know exactly what happens, nor do the characters, because life as we know it quickly falls apart. Wars, riots, famine, new flu disease (How prescient was this written in 1996!!) and soon the supplies are short and people dies. After the last ominous trip to a now ghost town where supplie are gone, father and daughters have to make do in their forest house as best as they can. There’s no more contact with the world, no electricity, no internet, no radio. Their only neighbours 10 miles away have gone and their house is left derelict. At first they manage well in their autonomy. The girls are 16 and 17 and the three of them survive well enough...But I won’t tell the story further as it is gripping and best left to discover. Reading it in a time of pandemic and threats to our world on all sides, it could not have been more topical but also offers a wonderful way out too. I cannot recommend this book enough and having seen the film version of it, can only say forget the film, read the book!
Report
Amanda Jenkinson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The future?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 19, 2017
Set in the near-future, the US is gradually crumbling. The infrastructure is breaking down. We’re never told exactly why, but it is a scenario that is very convincing. We don’t know whether it is a global or local issue, but the way it happens is all too chillingly...See more
Set in the near-future, the US is gradually crumbling. The infrastructure is breaking down. We’re never told exactly why, but it is a scenario that is very convincing. We don’t know whether it is a global or local issue, but the way it happens is all too chillingly recognisable. The novel focuses on two teenaged sisters as they struggle to survive the collapse of their world. Left alone in their isolated home in the forest, the book examines how they cope, and how they gradually have to abandon all their hopes and aspirations, Nell to go to Harvard, and Eva to be a ballet dancer. Post-apocalyptic fiction is at its most frightening when firmly rooted in familiar reality, and Hegland uses trivial detail to great effect – just what it feels like when you get to your last tea bag, what that last chocolate actually tastes like. This is by no means a perfect book. There are a few incidents that seem both unnecessary and awkward, and readers will be divided on how realistic and effective the ending is. But overall, this is a compelling read, and one that would offer reading groups much to discuss and no doubt argue about. A positive addition both to the post-apocalyptic canon and to coming-of-age literature, it’s a book I’ve been delighted to discover.
5 people found this helpful
Report
Eileen Shaw
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Night after night I dreamed my father was torn from his grave."
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 3, 2013
The blurb on the cover compares this book to The Handmaid''s Tale, but, written in 1996, Into The Forest it is much more similar to The Road, Cormac McCarthy''s tale of the end of time, written much later, in 2006. In this scenario the main characters are two sisters: Nell,...See more
The blurb on the cover compares this book to The Handmaid''s Tale, but, written in 1996, Into The Forest it is much more similar to The Road, Cormac McCarthy''s tale of the end of time, written much later, in 2006. In this scenario the main characters are two sisters: Nell, who narrates their story, and turns into someone I felt much empathy for, and Eva who fixated on becoming a dancer from a very early age. Their childhood was elegiac as they lived in the middle of a forested area of which their father owned eighty acres. Nell only resents that she is home-schooled and the highlight of her week is the Saturday night gathering of young people in and around the local school - there she meets Eli and they make a connection that is to be all-important to Nell. But this is the end of days. What use is a computer when you have no electricity, no gas for your car, not that there is much to buy anymore, and people are leaving, gravitating to the nearest metropolis, or going somewhere, anywhere, where there''s a rumour that things are better. Over the years their parents die, their father by a horrific accident. Could you kill a hog? Could you survive near-starvation and give birth to a child with no modern medicine to help you? In a sense, the sisters are fortunate in their isolation, with only a few shocks and reverses to throw them into a panic or otherwise disturb their hard-working but independent lives. The sisters, are both very well-characterised and though they are often at loggerheads the tenderness and love between them is beautifully depicted. As the book picks up the main theme, which is survival by regression they are pioneers, in a sense, rediscovering how to plant vegetables, how to preserve them, how to get by with fewer and fewer of the modern necessities we rely on. It''s a beautiful story and is only 239 pages long. I wished it were longer. It''s one of the best `end of time'' stories I''ve come across.
Report
Wild Wolf Tears
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 1, 2016
I enjoyed reading this book. I liked the attention and connection to nature. The prose was delightful, impressive even, and when I was hoping for the plot to move into something more ''action'', for something to happen, her writing kept me interested. What happens in the...See more
I enjoyed reading this book. I liked the attention and connection to nature. The prose was delightful, impressive even, and when I was hoping for the plot to move into something more ''action'', for something to happen, her writing kept me interested. What happens in the story is quite realistic if that were to happen... Well worth a read, the prose is really good
Report
Willnotcutt
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
better than the film
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 22, 2018
a good read and made the last part understandable . there was much more about their mother too which helped
One person found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 14 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • speculative fiction
  • flipping houses books

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale

new arrival Into high quality 2021 the Forest outlet online sale